‘There is Always The Other Side’: Fried Plantains in Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea (1966)

Until last month, I had never been to the Caribbean. Or the Tropics. Or something that could be vaguely classified as either, except perhaps the North-East of Australia. Then, a few weeks ago I had the chance to go to one of the Canary Islands for a short holiday and its beauty struck me with the strength of a long-awaited revelation. I have to say, … Continue reading ‘There is Always The Other Side’: Fried Plantains in Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea (1966)

Frugal January: Victorian Gruel from Oliver Twist (1837)

Straight after the usual exuberance and abundance of the festive season one feels the urgency of going on some sort of detox diet, and my January has been particularly frugal. This month’s frugality has given new importance to breakfast in my daily routine and made me more creative in my re-thinking morning porridge: oats, rye flakes, quinoa, or buckwheat, are all the rage in my … Continue reading Frugal January: Victorian Gruel from Oliver Twist (1837)

Enduring classic?: Sweetmeats in ‘Pamela’

Although it’s December 21st, this isn’t exactly a Christmas post; but I do think that today’s recipe is a good one for the festive season! This post actually marks a first at the Literary Kitchen: I am writing about a novel I didn’t enjoy reading. In fact, I found that wading through Pamela; or Virtue Rewarded (1740) by Samuel Richardson is not a good way to spend … Continue reading Enduring classic?: Sweetmeats in ‘Pamela’

A Tin of Biscuits: Petit Beurres in Elizabeth Bowen’s The Last September (1929)

England has been swept by a real heat wave in the last couple of weeks; today, it seems like autumn is finally settling in – the sky has taken grey tinges, the trees are putting up their best colours, and one feels the need of putting an extra layer of clothes on, and using the oven. Today’s recipe comes from France, but is somehow linked … Continue reading A Tin of Biscuits: Petit Beurres in Elizabeth Bowen’s The Last September (1929)

Yogurt’s Ancestor: Mezzorado, or Soured Milk in Natalia Ginzburg’s Family Sayings (1963)

As I (Nico) was hiking in the mountains of beautiful Slovenia this summer, I came across one interesting dish: soured milk, or kislo mleko as they call it on the sunny side of the Alps. Made with one main simple ingredient (milk), it is nevertheless complex to make as it can easily go wrong – on one occasion, a farmer had to regretfully deny us … Continue reading Yogurt’s Ancestor: Mezzorado, or Soured Milk in Natalia Ginzburg’s Family Sayings (1963)

Updating Miss Havisham

Summer is the time when my (Amy’s) social media feeds fill up with pictures of weddings and everyone seems to be talking about the bride & groom’s choice of venue, colours, food, music… This summer the theme seems to be DIY weddings involving hand-crafted invitations, favours, decorations and – of course – cakes. I can now write that I have made my first cake for … Continue reading Updating Miss Havisham

Yellow and Golden Cakes for F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925)

With all the snow falling in England this January, we were getting quite restless in the Literary Kitchen, and so we have thought of making a short video to tell you what we make of food in The Great Gatsby, as well as show you how to make some really easy lemon cakes! Recipe Ingredients: Cake: 200g unsalted butter 250g caster sugar 3 eggs 2 … Continue reading Yellow and Golden Cakes for F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925)

Winter Enchantments: Turkish Delight in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)

Are you looking to win over a long-lost love? Or do you just need something to surprise your friends with at the regular pot luck after the winter break? Or maybe it is simply that all your New Year resolutions not to eat any sweets in 2015 have (already) vanished… With the December festivities just behind us, the Literary Kitchen wants to cheer up those … Continue reading Winter Enchantments: Turkish Delight in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)

From farm to factory: bread in Michael McLaverty’s “Call my Brother Back” (1939)

  The next instalment in our culinary cruise through literature takes us to the north of Ireland and the work of the writer Michael McLaverty. Born in 1904, McLaverty is one of Belfast’s most accomplished proponents of the short story and novel form. His first and best known novel, Call my Brother Back (1939) is an understated, poignant elegy to rural life. Set during the … Continue reading From farm to factory: bread in Michael McLaverty’s “Call my Brother Back” (1939)