A Literary History of Chocolate – Podcast

Hello friends and followers, The podcast of our lecture ‘A Literary History of Chocolate’, which took place on 23 September in Alington House, Durham, as part of a series of public lectures entitled Late Summer Lectures Series, is finally live! Simply follow the link below, and enjoy! (Best enjoyed with a cup of hot chocolate or a box of truffles in the vicinity) Nico & … Continue reading A Literary History of Chocolate – Podcast

A Literary History of Chocolate: Part 4

In both Mayan and Aztec civilizations chocolate was not only considered as a delicious and invigorating drink, but also as a form of currency: this partly explains why chocolate was drunk by mostly rich and noble men. Also, in the Maya culture only, wealthy men deemed chocolate an important part of engagement ceremonies and weddings: ‘one of the things that people did at such festivities … Continue reading A Literary History of Chocolate: Part 4

A Literary History of Chocolate: Part 3

In our last post, Nico introduced us to the idea that the industrial advances of the nineteenth century led to a revolution in the production and consumption of chocolate. From a hot drink for the elite, it had become a solid bar bought by the masses. The fashionable lord consuming a luxurious drink in the chocolate-house had passed into legend. And we can see this clearly in … Continue reading A Literary History of Chocolate: Part 3

A Literary History of Chocolate: Part 2

Similarly to England, in the early eighteenth century Italy saw the arrival and diffusion of the tea, coffee and chocolate, and the latter two in particular become particularly popular, with the creation of ‘botteghe del caffè’ (coffee houses), where you could also taste the miraculous chocolate drink – attitudes towards it were of course mixed, with one physician (Dr Giovanni Batista Felici) at the Tuscan … Continue reading A Literary History of Chocolate: Part 2