Places and pies in Edith Wharton’s “Ethan Frome” (1911)

Welcome back to the Literary Kitchen! As the last leaves fall and December arrives we leave Belfast (see the last post below) to embark on the long journey to the New World. More specifically, to the symbolically named Starkfield, New England, at the turn of the twentieth century. Spaces and places are central to all of Wharton’s novels, and Ethan Frome is no exception. However, … Continue reading Places and pies in Edith Wharton’s “Ethan Frome” (1911)

From farm to factory: bread in Michael McLaverty’s “Call my Brother Back” (1939)

  The next instalment in our culinary cruise through literature takes us to the north of Ireland and the work of the writer Michael McLaverty. Born in 1904, McLaverty is one of Belfast’s most accomplished proponents of the short story and novel form. His first and best known novel, Call my Brother Back (1939) is an understated, poignant elegy to rural life. Set during the … Continue reading From farm to factory: bread in Michael McLaverty’s “Call my Brother Back” (1939)

The ‘bitten macaroon’: Ibsen’s A Doll’s House (1879)

In the world famous Norwegian play A Doll’s House, Henrik Ibsen has Nora, the protagonist, eat macaroons from the very first scene: Nora has just got back home from her Christmas shopping, and stealthily eats some macaroons — with this very small yet important action, the audience immediately understands that the macaroons hide more relevance than that they actually show. Our attention is drawn to … Continue reading The ‘bitten macaroon’: Ibsen’s A Doll’s House (1879)